The heartbeat of the Old South.

William Faulkner, marvelously complex and yet relentlessly simple at the same time, was a master of observation and melancholy. The haunting paragraph that opens the second chapter (“June second 1910”) of The Sound and the Fury lingers in the fog of the hours:

“When the shadow of the sash appeared on the curtains it was between seven and eight o’clock and then I was in time again, hearing the watch. It was Grandfather’s and when Father gave it to me he said, ‘I give you the mausoleum of all hope and desire; it’s rather excruciatingly apt that you will use it to gain the reducto absurdum of all human experience which can fit your individual needs no better than it fitted his or his father’s. I give it to you not that you may remember time, but that you might forget it now and then for a moment and not spend all your breath trying to conquer it. Because no battle is ever won,’ he said. ‘They are not even fought. The field only reveals to man his own folly and despair, and victory is an illusion of philosophers and fools.'”

About i100x

Jim Killion has served hundreds of nonprofit organizations in the course of his distinguished career. He launched his first digital group in 1995 and has been breaking interactive barriers ever since. Jim was a founder of Killion McCabe & Associates (now KMA Direct Communications), Lightsource, is7, and ur mobile. His career highlights are people. Jim has recruited and mentored scores of remarkable people during his career. Many now lead direct response agencies, creative service firms, and software companies. He and his wife, Kathi, are the proud parents of two daughters and the grandparents of the two most wonderful and remarkable children on planet earth.
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One Response to The heartbeat of the Old South.

  1. Ron Brackin says:

    “Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow creeps in this petty pace from day to day, and all our yesterdays have lighted fools the way to dusty death. Out, out brief candle! Life’s but a walking shadow, a poor player, that struts and frets his hour upon the stage and then is heard no more. It is a tale told by an idiot, full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.”

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